About Cardiff University: Home of Innovation

You might read this on your smartphone, relying on communications networks and mobile technology that would not exist without compound semiconductors. Performing up to 100 times faster than silicon chips, they are at the heart of emerging communications systems, healthcare technologies, autonomous vehicles and a host of unimagined applications.

We have worked on compound semiconductor technology for decades, intensifying our efforts in recent years. Collaborating with IQE, we have invested in new staff, equipment and facilities to give compound semiconductor companies and their supply chains streamlined access to our expertise.

The University and IQE have formally established a for-profit joint-venture: Compound Semiconductor Centre Ltd. Employing 75 highly-skilled staff, it enables industry to mass produce technologies developed with the expertise of University scientists.

We have also established the Institute for Compound Semiconductors. It is led by world-renowned expert Professor Diana Huffaker, recruited from UCLA via the Sêr Cymru programme, alongside an international team.

We are investing heavily in facilities for the Institute on a £300m Innovation Campus, with additional support from UK Government, Welsh Government and the Welsh European Funding Office. The Institute’s move to the Campus will see it located alongside experts in chemistry, data innovation, sustainability and economics – creating a hub for spinning out compound semiconductors into new sectors.

We are the lead in the EPSRC’s £12m Future Compound Semiconductor Manufacturing Hub. Led by Professor Peter Smowton, it involves three other universities and 26 companies. Its mission is to boost the uptake of compound semiconductor technology by applying silicon manufacturing approaches. In short, it takes decades of silicon expertise and makes it usable for one of this century’s growth industries.

Silicon once supported the information society, but compound semiconductors will enable this century’s breakthroughs. We see it as part of our civic mission to ensure Wales and UK are at the forefront of those breakthroughs

Professor Colin Riordan, Vice-Chancellor, Cardiff University

You might read this on your smartphone, relying on communications networks and mobile technology that would not exist without compound semiconductors. Performing up to 100 times faster than silicon chips, they are at the heart of emerging communications systems, healthcare technologies, autonomous vehicles and a host of unimagined applications.

We have worked on compound semiconductor technology for decades, intensifying our efforts in recent years. Collaborating with IQE, we have invested in new staff, equipment and facilities to give compound semiconductor companies and their supply chains streamlined access to our expertise.

The University and IQE have formally established a for-profit joint-venture: Compound Semiconductor Centre Ltd. Employing 75 highly-skilled staff, it enables industry to mass produce technologies developed with the expertise of University scientists.

We have also established the Institute for Compound Semiconductors. It is led by world-renowned expert Professor Diana Huffaker, recruited from UCLA via the Sêr Cymru programme, alongside an international team.

We are investing heavily in facilities for the Institute on a £300m Innovation Campus, with additional support from UK Government, Welsh Government and the Welsh European Funding Office. The Institute’s move to the Campus will see it located alongside experts in chemistry, data innovation, sustainability and economics – creating a hub for spinning out compound semiconductors into new sectors.

We are the lead in the EPSRC’s £12m Future Compound Semiconductor Manufacturing Hub. Led by Professor Peter Smowton, it involves three other universities and 26 companies. Its mission is to boost the uptake of compound semiconductor technology by applying silicon manufacturing approaches. In short, it takes decades of silicon expertise and makes it usable for one of this century’s growth industries.

Silicon once supported the information society, but compound semiconductors will enable this century’s breakthroughs. We see it as part of our civic mission to ensure Wales and UK are at the forefront of those breakthroughs

Professor Colin Riordan, Vice-Chancellor, Cardiff University

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/